'

U.S. Navy submarine tests four nuclear capable Trident II D5 missiles

The U.S. Navy has reported on Friday that has Ohio class of nuclear-powered submarine tested four life-extended Trident II D5 missiles to validate their performance.

“The U.S. Navy conducted four scheduled missile test flights of unarmed Trident II (D5) missiles from USS Nebraska (SSBN-739), an Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine, off the coast of Southern California this week,” a service news release states.

The first two launches took place Sept. 4, and the last two were Sept. 6. All occurred before sunrise.

These test flights were part of a Commander Evaluation Test (CET) whose primary goal was to validate performance expectations of the life-extended Trident II (D5) strategic weapon system.

These launches mark 176 successful flights of the Trident II (D5) strategic weapon system. CETs and other flight tests are conducted on a recurring, scheduled basis to evaluate and ensure the continued reliability and accuracy of the system. The missile tests were not conducted in response to any ongoing world events.

“Our nation’s sea-based deterrent has been a critical component of ournational security since the 1960s, and this week’s launches continue to demonstrate the credibility and reliability of our life-extended missiles,” said Vice Adm. Johnny R. Wolfe, director of the Navy’s Strategic Systems Programs, the command responsible for the Navy’s strategic weapons.

The Trident II (D5) strategic weapon system, originally designed with a life span to 2024, recently underwent a life extension that will keep it operational through the late 2040s. The life-extended missiles will serve for the remaining service life of U.S Ohio-class and United Kingdom Vanguard-class SSBNs, and as the initial loadout for the U.S. Columbia-class and U.K. Dreadnought-class SSBNs.

The life extension program addressed potential aging and obsolescence issues. “The life extended missiles are now being deployed to the Fleet, but ourwork is not done,” Wolfe said.

“The nuclear deterrence mission is the Department of Defense’s …read more

Read more here:: Defence Blog (Naval)

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close