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Huntington Ingalls awarded $67M contract modification for USS Columbus submarine upgrade

The U.S. Navy’s largest shipbuilder, Huntington Ingalls, has been awarded a $67 million U.S. Navy contract modification for USS Columbus (SSN 762) submarine upgrade.

The U.S. Navy has announced a $67 million modification contract with Huntington Ingalls’s shipbuilding division for continue performance of the repair, maintenance, upgrades, and modernization efforts on USS Columbus (SSN 762) Engineered Overhaul.

The contracted requirements include the continuance of execution and new work efforts arising from the Availability Work Package (AWP) and additional required work discovered during the inspection of shipboard components. This work is necessary to ensure the submarine is operating at full technical capacity as defined in the AWP during the CNO scheduled availability.

USS Columbus is the 51st Los Angeles-class submarine and the 12th improved version of this class, which includes a vertical launch system for Tomahawk cruise missiles and an improved hull design for under-ice operations.

In June 1994, she completed a post-shipyard maintenance availability in Groton, Conn., after initial construction and shakedown operations. In September 1994, the ship conducted an inter-fleet transfer to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, and joined the U.S. Pacific Fleet Submarine Force.

The USS Columbus (SSN 762) submarine is one of the most advanced undersea vessels in the world, and its missions include deployment of special forces, minelaying, precision land attack, or anti-submarine or surface warfare while remaining undetected. It is 377 feet long, 34 feet wide, and weighs nearly 7,800 tons. It is powered by a nuclear reactor to push the boat through the water at speeds of more than 25 knots while submerged. As the most modern and sophisticated attack submarine in the world, the Columbus can operate in both littoral and deep ocean environments and presents combatant commanders with a broad and unique range of operational capabilities.

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Read more here:: Defence Blog (Naval)

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